millie says know the ins and outs of bowel action

know the ‘ins’ and mostly ‘outs’ of bowel action.
1. it’s normal to have an easy well formed bowel movement 1-3 times per day, ideally corresponding with the number of time you’ve eaten.
2. it’s not normal to ‘miss’ a day
3. high impact exercise (walking, running, dancing, stair climbing) uses gravity to assist in the compacting of stool in the colon and rectum
4. relaxing on the toilet properly promotes liberation
5. straining not only breaks blood vessels on the skin but can cause bleeding at the anus.
6. fluids and fibre are needed in large amounts to promote proper bowel action. 8-10 cups of liquid (ideally water) and a minimum of 30 grams of fibre. the standard north american diet contains 5-8 grams per day.
7. constipation is the most common cause of hemorrhoids, fissures
8. constipation contributes to bowel and colon cancer.

check out the top twenty fibre foods and other info here:

http://www.wehealnewyork.org/healthinfo/dietaryfiber/index.html

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says make curds and whey

warning: EXTREME health food recommendation:

make curds and whey. miss muffet ate hers sitting on a tuffet since she had time but even if you dont muffet a tuffet for your duff-et you can still eat this probiotic delicacy. these days the commercially prepared version uses renet from the cow’s stomach and calls it cottage cheese with the solid being the curd, the liquid being the whey… but then they wash away the whey so it dont taste sour but they darn near ruined it cuz it dont have no probiotic in it, mama! better to make this mixture of sweet and sour at home. allow a quart’a milk or buttermilk sit on your kitchen counter in a mason jar for 3 days driving up the healthy bacteria content- that’s it. when the milk solids separate from the liquid you got yourself curds and whey. instead of waiting three days you can also take a cup of milk add a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar and watch it happen in front of your very eyes but best to do it right. next step put the curd through a cheese cloth or stocking letting it drip even more whey out from under it for a period of 12 hours or so. the solid creamy mass before you is…voila home made cream cheese. the left over whey is a definite sour sup of healthy dose bacteria can be used to make bread, pickles or just drunk sweetened or not. see below for more whey recipes. extreme.

http://fiascofarm.com/dairy/ricotta.html

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says buy into brown apricots

buy into brown apricots. sulphates are one of the oldest preservatives in food, keeping everything from dried fruits to wine and beer to deli and luncheon meats to sausages to instant potatoes aged just-right for the taste of convenience. these foods made at home would contain health preserving probiotics and sea salt, but for the million-mile diet without the sulphates (sulfates), foods dont keep as long and cost more due to ‘get-what-you-pay-for’ philosophy of cost over quality. key point is that studies show it’s better to keep this nasty preservative out of the diet as it’s been linked to the embarrassing rotten egg smell emanating from you-know-where to food allergies to inflammatory bowel diseases to colon cancer. due to a string of chemical processes that create sulphur-reducing baceria in the gut, your intestines could resemble the sludge at the bottom of from a scottish swamp, and that aint healthy but capable of coroding metal tubes, let alone tissue pipes. here we go: sulphates in food and drink > sulphites > then create a poisonous waste product called hydrogen sulphide (odorous), which to humans, the compound is as toxic as cyanide > in water, it rapidly becomes highly corrosive sulphuric acid. so eat suphur like cabbage and garlic but not sulphates like orange apricots and pastrami.

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says boil badadas (potatos)

boil badadas. while variety counts and I offer up blues, sweets and yukon gold potatos are preferences to the white Idahos due to the fact that the formers are not members of the nightshade family and therefore do not promote inflammation in the joints like the latter. Variety is not the only thing to follow however as method of cooking determines the glycemic index. The higher the temperature during cooking the more simple sugars become available. A baked, roasted, BBQ or microwaved potato has a very high glycemic index of 84-93 as compared to a boiled new potato whose level is down in the low 50s. This means that for every teaspoon of oven-made patate, the carbohydrate content more closely resembles white sugar (glycemic index of 100). the higher the glycemic index the more the potato raises insulin levels, promotes hyper/hypoglycemia and starves the brain of energy long-term. So put bud the spud from the bright red mud in a pot of boiling water and turn it down to 6.

ps: cook until soft. spoon yellow cultured butter on it, a sprinkle of sea salt, a pinch of tarragon or dill. serve with fish and greens. a perfect meal.  dont forget to eat the skins.

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says soak grains in brackish water

soak grains in brackish water. back in the days of pure water and healthy sunshine, grains were kept in outdoor storage units before being hulled thus exposing them to the elements of sun and rain and morning dew. the process of moistening grains in healthy bacteria allows for the neutralization of phytic acid, a compound that keeps minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium and calcium bound to phosphate salt rather than nutritionally available in grains. these days, due to faster machinery to do the work grains are not exposed to the elements after they are harvested, thus left in their indigestible state and must be fortified with minerals instead. the result is that grains these days are apt to cause bloating, constipation, diarrhea, celiac, IBS symptoms, ezcema. if sprouting is too daunting but if this is the case then soak all grains overnight in a fermented product such as apple cider vinegar or butter milk in order to alkalinize, soften and prepare the grains for eating.

http://www.thepassionategourmet.com/

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says cooks the reds

cook the reds. lycopene, a bright red phytochemical related to beta carotene (double-bond-vitamin A) has been singled out a quencher of radical oxygen species, surmounting those abilities in Vitamin E by 100 times. finally providing another benefit for mass-pasteurization of food, this juicey red pigment becomes bio-active only when cooked because it is not destroyed in boiling water, concentrates when water evaporates, binds to fibre and fat…so the more processed the tomato product theoretically the more lycopene available to the crimson-eater . while studies are up in the air as to its benefit for the following diseases: osteoporosis, cardiovascular, diabetes, cancer and male infertility, it remains a stable reason why red fruits and vegetables are encouraged eating material. though cooked watermelon pink grapefruit, pink guava and papaya might not be your thang, although delectable in jams, jellies and pasteurized juices, simmer red bell peppers and tomatoes in olive oil for assimilation is a strategic lycopene-heavy side dish or sauce. or have a cup of rosehip tea a day to keep the prostate at bay.

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says select superior salba seed

select superior salba seed. an ancient medicinal food related to the mint plant, Salvia hispanica L, was historically used by the aztecs who fed it to their messengers to give them running stamina. the white colored salba has been bred to be higher in nutrients than many other superfoods combined. nutty, gelatinous and satisfying this superseed is high protein, omega 3, fibre, magnesium, folate (folic acid), potassium, calcium, iron and vitamin C. satisfying as it cuts foods cravings, maintains blood sugar levels and encourages a positive mood, consider this a well rounded food supplement. Take in porridge, cereal, shakes, salads, yogurt, bread or by itself, 2 tablespoons reportedly contains 6 X more calcium than a glass of milk. so watcha waiting for, suck on salba.

www.sourcesalba.com

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says fix the chocolate

fix the chocolate. cocoa, a naturally brown-not-white- bitter condiment in its cooked form contains caffeine, theobromine, theophyllines and tyramines, is habit forming and hepato(liver)toxic enough to kill a dog. When milk-laden though it’s liver toxic capacity decreases as does it’s nutritional presence and the insulinergic and hyperglycemic strength soars as it takes fat and sugar to boot to get it to taste so sweet. cacao or raw chocolate, however is dried without heat and preserved in it’s natural skin, like a peanut. it is high in antioxidants, minerals such as calcium and magnesium, lower in caffeine. actually relaxing to the central nervous system, a serotonin mimicker, naturally unsweetened, it makes a good afternoon feel-good snack. mix with flax, sunflower seeds and dried cherries for a taste explosion. second fix idea, take hot cocoa flavored with cinnamon or cayenne, salba, stevia or dark maple syrup to get your fix. count chocula has nothing on you.

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says gastronomes gather gastric juices

gastronomes gather gastric juices. while foodies may shun the suggestion of keeping meat and bread separate, combining food strategically to benefit digestion is a good tip in times of gastric distress. basic principles of proper food combinations are that simple carbohydrates are digested in the mouth, complex carbohydrates in the small intestine, proteins in the stomach and fats in the intestines. when eating it’s best to avoid eating different food groups (proteins and carbs) to allow enzymatic action to be focused in either stomach or intestines rather than both at once. improperly digested food from stomach and intestines will cause indigestion in the form of burps, rot, bloat, flips and farts. uggh. make it easy on yourself by eating dairy, veg and animal protein with non starchy veggies and fats, complex carbs and starch with non starchy veggies and fats. fruit on its own. not much evidence for or against, but interesting to experiment with for those weak in the digestion. calm with combinations.

http://drbass.com/sequential.html

xox dr millie lytle nd

millie says do it by hand

do it by hand. electric grinders, mills, presses and juicers are fast and easy boasting razor sharp stainless steel blades that’ll slice and dice through the most fibrous of vegetative matter. while returning the electric juicer, blender or coffee mill to the Bay may not be the fate of the day, keeping it real by grinding flax seeds and raw cacao in a pepper mill, or using a mortar and pestle to create the curry kills at least four, five or six figurative birds with one hand-thrown stone. 1) heat generated from an electric mill destroys important enzymes necessary to the vitality of the food product 2) it’s greener to do it by hand 3) it’s cheaper to do it by hand 4) people are meditatively building their muscles all over the world with this hand grinding technique whether they have access to electricity or a fancy workout parlour. 5) it tastes better 6) the loose dust generated from the mashing of a granite mortar and pestle contains 16 trace minerals including potassium in a more digestible form than those compressed into a daily multi-vite-min. basically it’s efficient a mano.

xox dr millie lyte nd